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Thoughts and Experiences from the Mile High City of Denver, Colorado

Democrats Seek to Repeal 2002 War Authorization (In Their Dreams...)

Peter

In an article today in the Washington Post, "Democrats Seek to Repeal 2002 War Authorization", the Democrats are looking to bring a bill forward to, "repeal the 2002 resolution authorizing the war in Iraq in favor of narrower authority that restricts the military's role and begins withdrawals of combat troops." How do they think that this will get through? They tried to get a non-binding resolution through Congress and couldn't. What makes them think that this bill will stand a better chance of getting through? Even if it does get through, it will ultimately face a veto and Congress does not have enough votes to override that veto.

The minute that they start restricting what commanders can do and go in a country in a war, the more problems that will come up and the more that this will devolve into a Vietnam like conflict.

Our troops need all the support that we can give them and the commanders need the flexibility to be able to respond to any threat that faces our troops there. Any less and Congress will be hanging them out to dry.

This is just plain politics and every one knows it. Congress should continue their oversight role it has on the Executive Branch regarding Iraq, but it should also start work on many other issues facing this country than just focusing on this one issue that they have focused on since this Congress began in January.

The Oxford Medievalist had some good comments in their post yesterday, Murtha's Slow Bleed Gets Swift Death, Senate's Still Alive.

"The Oxford Medievalist supports the idea of responsible Congressional oversight of the Iraq War—any war, for that matter. But the President of the United States is the Commander-in Chief of the United States military, and Congress has no business micromanaging the conduct of war. If you don’t like war, or do not wish for it to be fought in a way which it cannot be won (which is what the effort by the Democratic majority is all about), then you shouldn’t be authorizing the use of force in the first place."

Stop grandstanding and get something done. If not, they will be out on the street like the last Republican Congress.